It can be stressful to hire new employees, either to replace retirees or for newly created positions. It’s frustrating to spend hours preparing the job listing and performing searches only to come up empty-handed. Even worse is to realize three months into the new hire’s engagement that you’ve got the wrong person. How can you improve your hiring process? Here are some suggestions that may increase your chances of success.

Evaluate the Need

The first thing to do is to be sure you need the position at all. Are you replacing an employee who is leaving? Ask yourself if the job is still relevant. Perhaps it can be combined with another position or eliminated entirely. You can always hire a temp for a few months from staffing companies in Boston MA to help you determine just what the job description should be. If it proves that the temp is performing redundant work, there’s your answer.

Improve the Process

Be sure to list all job requirements in the job listing. Include education required and the experience you’d like to see. The more specific you are, the more likely the right candidate is to find you. Forget about those irrelevant questions that are meant to catch candidates off guard. Focus instead on really getting to know their capabilities, knowledge, and attitude. Be sure to include others in your company who can give insight, such as department heads or floor managers.

Look for Commitment

When you see candidates’ resumes, check for a commitment to their profession. Do they switch jobs frequently? This could be a sign they are just chasing a higher salary. Check with previous employers to learn why they left. You want employees who will establish loyalty with your company and be around for the long haul.

Get Social

Hard skills are important, but employees need to become a part of your company culture. Check out all the candidates’ social media platforms. Google their names and see what hits you get. If one candidate is proudly posting photos of his wilderness hunting trip and your company is committed to animal welfare, he may not be a good match. Also, take candidates out to lunch. Spend time talking to them about things other than the job.

Don’t Settle

If the first candidate isn’t right, move on. If the whole pool of applicants is poor, start over with a better job description. Never hire out of desperation.