All too often, people find themselves in financial difficulties for one reason or another. One solution that they may consider is filing for personal bankruptcy. Anyone who is contemplating this step needs to know some important information before they make their decision. This article will provide that information.

Many people do not know that student loans are not dischargeable debt under bankruptcy laws. Do not go into your bankruptcy thinking that your student loans will be discharged, because only in cases of extreme hardship are they considered. If the job you received from pursuing your degree will never allow you to pay off your debt, you may have a chance, but it is highly unlikely.

If you are planning to file for bankruptcy in the near future, don’t charge up your credit cards thinking that you won’t have to pay back the debt. In many states, there are rules about how much credit card debt and what kind, may be discharged in a bankruptcy. For instance, if you make purchases for luxury items, such as an expensive new TV, within 6 months prior to filing, you may be obligated to pay that amount back. On the other hand, if you used your credit card to purchase groceries, or other necessities, the rules may be different. Be sure to ask your attorney for advice.

A critical tip in filing personal bankruptcy is to steer clear of making payments to creditors, in advance of filing a petition, in an attempt to satisfy individual debts in full outside of bankruptcy court. Payments to family members and creditors made within defined periods of time prior to a bankruptcy filing can be voided and can jeopardize the chances of receiving a discharge of all debts in the case.

Find out the real reason you are filing for bankruptcy. What happened in your life that brought you to this place? What do you need to do to make sure that you can move on? What actions do you need to take before you can be sure that this will never happen again?

Consider filing Chapter 13 rather than Chapter 7, if you are facing foreclosure. A Chapter 13 bankruptcy allows you to create a restructured payment plan which includes your mortgage arrears. This will allow you to get your mortgage payments current, so that you won’t lose your home. Chapter 13 doesn’t require you to turn over property, so you don’t have to worry about the homestead exemption, either.

Know the difference between Chapters 7 and 13 bankruptcies. Chapter 7 will wipe your debts clean, meaning you will not owe what you file against. Chapter 13 requires you to agree to repay your debts. These debts need to be repaid within three to five years of the filing date.

By now, anyone who is interested in learning more about filing for personal bankruptcy should realize how the process works. While doing so can have many long-term ramifications, filing for bankruptcy is often the best choice for those in financial straits. With the advice from this article, the process should go more smoothly. For more information on click here: http://www.financebenefits.us